With the Knowledge Graph, we’re continuing to go beyond keyword matching to better understand the people, places and things you care about. To do this, we not only organize information about webpages but other types of information too. Today, Google Search can help you search text from millions of books from major libraries, find travel times from your local public transit agency, or help you navigate data from public sources like the World Bank.
Web indexing (or Internet indexing) refers to methods for indexing the contents of a website or of the Internet as a whole. Individual websites or intranets may use a back-of-the-book index, while search engines usually use keywords and metadata to provide a more useful vocabulary for Internet or onsite searching. With the increase in the number of periodicals that have articles online, web indexing is also becoming important for periodical websites.[1]

The web is like an ever-growing library with billions of books and no central filing system. We use software known as web crawlers to discover publicly available webpages. Crawlers look at webpages and follow links on those pages, much like you would if you were browsing content on the web. They go from link to link and bring data about those webpages back to Google’s servers.
The main aim of Googlebot and its crawlers is to not degrade the user experience while visiting any site. To not let these bots affect your website speed, there is functionality where the google crawl rate can be monitored and optimized. This can be done using Google Search Console. Visit the crawl stats and analyze how the bots crawl your site. One can manually set the Google crawl rate and limit the speed as per the need. This will help you ease the issue without overwhelming the server bandwidth.
FamilySearch indexing accesses digital image collections throughout the world. Contractual agreements with record custodians require that these images be protected. A FamilySearch account is the authorization system used to protect them. A FamilySearch account connects you to FamilySearch Family Tree and free records, and allows you to participate with indexing.
Divide your site map into categories (optional). If your site map lists more than 100 links, Google may mistake it for spam. It's best to list just the main categories instead, divided by topic, chronology, or some other method that helps your users.[4][5] For example, wikiHow's site map only lists general categories. Clicking "Aviation" takes you to a smaller "map" of Aviation-related pages.
Back-of-the-book-style web indexes may be called "web site A-Z indexes".[2] The implication with "A-Z" is that there is an alphabetical browse view or interface. This interface differs from that of a browse through layers of hierarchical categories (also known as a taxonomy) which are not necessarily alphabetical, but are also found on some web sites. Although an A-Z index could be used to index multiple sites, rather than the multiple pages of a single site, this is unusual.
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