If you have a lot of errors on your site for Google, Google will start crawling slowly too. To speed up the crawl process, fix those errors. Simply 301 redirect those erroring pages to proper URLs on your site. If you don’t know where to find those errors: log into Google Search Console. If you have access to your site’s access logs, you can also look at those, preferably with a tool like Screaming Frog’s Log file analyzer. To prevent your site from being crawled slowly, it’s important that you regularly look at your site’s errors and fix them. We have a more extensive article on fixing 404 errors to help with that.
@Ωmega - Yeah, the subdomain thing with that tool is frustrating in some ways, but I can understand why they did it. In that case, I'm pretty sure there's no way that is both easy and gets the links recrawled quickly. That leaves you with: quick(ish) recrawl = use google.com/addurl and answer all the captchas, or easy = just wait until Google recrawls of it's own volition. Depending on how often the content on all your links are regularly updated, it might be that long if you just wait, though that's obviously not an ideal solution. Sorry I can't be more help. – kevinmicke May 30 '14 at 17:11
Search engines aren’t perfect. They can’t find everything on their own. Submitting your website manually makes it easier for the major players to begin ranking your website for keywords. By submitting your website manually you can also give the search engines information they couldn’t figure out on their own such as the importance of each of your website’s pages.

Quicker and more comprehensive indexing of your site will occur if your content is fresh, original, useful, easy to navigate, and being linked to from elsewhere on the web. These tools can’t guarantee Google will deem your site indexable. And they shouldn’t be used as an alternative to publishing content which is adding value to the internet ecosystem.

Back-of-the-book-style web indexes may be called "web site A-Z indexes".[2] The implication with "A-Z" is that there is an alphabetical browse view or interface. This interface differs from that of a browse through layers of hierarchical categories (also known as a taxonomy) which are not necessarily alphabetical, but are also found on some web sites. Although an A-Z index could be used to index multiple sites, rather than the multiple pages of a single site, this is unusual.

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