Use Google Search Console to track your website. Google recommends logging in about once a month to see if there are any surprising errors or dips in traffic.[2] This site also provides a variety of indexing-related tools. For example, you can confirm that Google can access your pages ("Fetch as Google"), notify Google of a domain change ("Change of Address"), and issue urgent blocks on content you need to take off your site ("Remove URLs").
We offer Search Console to give site owners granular choices about how Google crawls their site: they can provide detailed instructions about how to process pages on their sites, can request a recrawl or can opt out of crawling altogether using a file called “robots.txt”. Google never accepts payment to crawl a site more frequently — we provide the same tools to all websites to ensure the best possible results for our users.
Divide your site map into categories (optional). If your site map lists more than 100 links, Google may mistake it for spam. It's best to list just the main categories instead, divided by topic, chronology, or some other method that helps your users.[4][5] For example, wikiHow's site map only lists general categories. Clicking "Aviation" takes you to a smaller "map" of Aviation-related pages.
The web is like an ever-growing library with billions of books and no central filing system. We use software known as web crawlers to discover publicly available webpages. Crawlers look at webpages and follow links on those pages, much like you would if you were browsing content on the web. They go from link to link and bring data about those webpages back to Google’s servers.
If you simply have too many URLs on your site, Google might crawl a lot but it will never be enough. This can happen because of faceted search navigation for instance, or another system on your site that simply generates too many URLs. To figure out whether this is the case for you, it’s always wise to regularly crawl your own site. You can either do that manually with Screaming Frog’s SEO spider, or with a tool like Ryte.
What systems will you adopt for publishing your content? Systems are basically just repeatable routines and steps to get a complex task completed. They’ll help you save time and write your content more quickly, so you can stay on schedule. Anything that helps you publish content in less time without sacrificing quality will improve your bottom line.
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