Use Google Search Console to track your website. Google recommends logging in about once a month to see if there are any surprising errors or dips in traffic.[2] This site also provides a variety of indexing-related tools. For example, you can confirm that Google can access your pages ("Fetch as Google"), notify Google of a domain change ("Change of Address"), and issue urgent blocks on content you need to take off your site ("Remove URLs").
@Ωmega - Yeah, the subdomain thing with that tool is frustrating in some ways, but I can understand why they did it. In that case, I'm pretty sure there's no way that is both easy and gets the links recrawled quickly. That leaves you with: quick(ish) recrawl = use google.com/addurl and answer all the captchas, or easy = just wait until Google recrawls of it's own volition. Depending on how often the content on all your links are regularly updated, it might be that long if you just wait, though that's obviously not an ideal solution. Sorry I can't be more help. – kevinmicke May 30 '14 at 17:11
@Ωmega - Yeah, the subdomain thing with that tool is frustrating in some ways, but I can understand why they did it. In that case, I'm pretty sure there's no way that is both easy and gets the links recrawled quickly. That leaves you with: quick(ish) recrawl = use google.com/addurl and answer all the captchas, or easy = just wait until Google recrawls of it's own volition. Depending on how often the content on all your links are regularly updated, it might be that long if you just wait, though that's obviously not an ideal solution. Sorry I can't be more help. – kevinmicke May 30 '14 at 17:11
Divide your site map into categories (optional). If your site map lists more than 100 links, Google may mistake it for spam. It's best to list just the main categories instead, divided by topic, chronology, or some other method that helps your users.[4][5] For example, wikiHow's site map only lists general categories. Clicking "Aviation" takes you to a smaller "map" of Aviation-related pages.

Most often, you’ll want to use the noindex tag. You usually only want to use nofollow for affiliate links, links someone has paid you to create, or you receive a commission from. This is because you don’t want to “sell links”. When you add nofollow, it tells Google not to pass on your domain authority to those sources. Essentially, it keeps the web free of corruption when it comes to linking.

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