Quicker and more comprehensive indexing of your site will occur if your content is fresh, original, useful, easy to navigate, and being linked to from elsewhere on the web. These tools can’t guarantee Google will deem your site indexable. And they shouldn’t be used as an alternative to publishing content which is adding value to the internet ecosystem.

Be it first time visitors or even existing customers, if your website is taking ages to load or if your website is down, they will go to your competitor. It becomes extremely important to prevent website downtime at any cost to live upto your brand’s reputation. Also with SEO being given ample importance, the aim becomes to be noticed by Google Bot.
If you simply have too many URLs on your site, Google might crawl a lot but it will never be enough. This can happen because of faceted search navigation for instance, or another system on your site that simply generates too many URLs. To figure out whether this is the case for you, it’s always wise to regularly crawl your own site. You can either do that manually with Screaming Frog’s SEO spider, or with a tool like Ryte.
The crawling process begins with a list of web addresses from past crawls and sitemaps provided by website owners. As our crawlers visit these websites, they use links on those sites to discover other pages. The software pays special attention to new sites, changes to existing sites and dead links. Computer programs determine which sites to crawl, how often and how many pages to fetch from each site.

Most often, you’ll want to use the noindex tag. You usually only want to use nofollow for affiliate links, links someone has paid you to create, or you receive a commission from. This is because you don’t want to “sell links”. When you add nofollow, it tells Google not to pass on your domain authority to those sources. Essentially, it keeps the web free of corruption when it comes to linking.
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